World Cup 2022: England fans face ban on SINGING as Qatar cops clamp down on chanting

England fans face ban on SINGING as Qatari cops clamp down on chanting following complaints about the noise

England fans hoping to roar on their team as they continue their World Cup campaign face being silenced after Qatari police clamped down on singing in public.

The Three Lions’ roving supporters, who have long been renowned for their chanting prowess when travelling abroad, could face sanctions from local officials after noise complaints were raised on the Gulf state’s public transport network.

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Rowdy South American fans were reportedly scolded by cops for singing loudly on the city’s metro after Ecuador beat the host nation 2-0 on Sunday.

Locals, said to be furious about the noise, gestured to patrolling officers indicating that they should intervene. 

The incident led to the authorities warning fans about lowering their volume, something which could raise concerns among England supporters.

It comes as fans dressed as Christian crusaders caused a stir in Qatar with one even blasting the conservative Muslim regime for their treatment of supporters on live TV.

Some Doha residents appear to have been upset by the choice of outfit, given the religious wars between 1095 and 1291 were about taking land and holy sites under Islamic control.

England fans hoping to roar on their team as they continue their World Cup campaign face being silenced after Qatari police clamped down on singing in public

England fans hoping to roar on their team as they continue their World Cup campaign face being silenced after Qatari police clamped down on singing in public

The Three Lions' roving supporters, who have long been renowned for their chanting prowess when travelling abroad, could face sanctions from local officials after noise complaints were raised on the Gulf state's public transport network

The Three Lions’ roving supporters, who have long been renowned for their chanting prowess when travelling abroad, could face sanctions from local officials after noise complaints were raised on the Gulf state’s public transport network

The incident led to the authorities warning fans about lowering their volume, something which could raise concerns among England supporters

The incident led to the authorities warning fans about lowering their volume, something which could raise concerns among England supporters

Crusaders and supporters in St George outfits have become a familiar sight at overseas England matches over the years – but the fancy dress will be far more controversial at the first World Cup ever held in a Muslim nation.

Footage from Qatar before and after the England game showed the group singing God Save the King and storming up the stairs on public transport. Some locals appeared shocked by their choice of outfits – others asked them to pose for selfies.

The latest incident follows days of mounting criticism for the Qatari police’s forceful handling of fans as the row over LGBT symbols rumbles on in the Gulf state. 

Qatar officials have repeatedly stated ‘all are welcome’ at the World Cup, despite the fact same-sex relationships remain illegal in the country. 

England and other teams planning to wear the ‘OneLove’ armbands to make a statement against discrimination during the World Cup in Qatar were also said to be ‘blackmailed’ with the looming threat of ‘massive sporting sanctions’. 

Fans and journalists from multiple nations have reported rainbow-themed items, including t-shirts, bucket hats and flags, being confiscated by officials.

The group of Christian Crusaders were later spotted outside the stadium for the England game. It is not clear if they were being turned away, as claimed on social

The group of Christian Crusaders were later spotted outside the stadium for the England game. It is not clear if they were being turned away, as claimed on social 

At one point the group, carrying foam swords and wearing chain mail and Knights Templar robes marked with the cross of St George, were spoken to by security in Doha outside the stadium. Some claimed on social media they were even turned away or detained.

At one point the group, carrying foam swords and wearing chain mail and Knights Templar robes marked with the cross of St George, were spoken to by security in Doha outside the stadium. Some claimed on social media they were even turned away or detained.

At one point the group, carrying foam swords and wearing chain mail and Knights Templar robes marked with the cross of St George, were spoken to by security in Doha outside the stadium. Some claimed on social media they were even turned away or detained.

At one point the group, carrying foam swords and wearing chain mail and Knights Templar robes marked with the cross of St George, were spoken to by security in Doha outside the stadium. Some claimed on social media they were even turned away or detained.

One recent incident on the Gulf state's public transport system saw police reprimand South American supporters were were reportedly 'singing too loudly'. [File image of football fans on Qatar's metro]

One recent incident on the Gulf state’s public transport system saw police reprimand South American supporters were were reportedly ‘singing too loudly’. [File image of football fans on Qatar’s metro]

Despite FIFA’s insistence that ‘all are welcome’ in the Gulf state, fans, journalists and LGBT groups have all faced an authoritarian-style crackdown with rainbow attire confiscated at stadiums. 

The sale of beer was also banned at stadiums in a stunning 11th-hour about turn by Qatari officials – leaving many fans fuming and FIFA red faced.

The Emir of Qatar Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad al-Thani demanded all visitors ‘respect our culture’, with fans expected to fall in line with the Gulf state’s rules and cultural practices.

It comes after days of criticism for the Qatari police’s forceful handling of fans as the row over LGBT symbols rumbles on in the Gulf state. 

Qatar officials have repeatedly stated ‘all are welcome’ at the World Cup, despite the fact same-sex relationships remain illegal in the country. 

England and other teams planning to wear the ‘OneLove’ armbands to make a statement against discrimination during the World Cup in Qatar were also said to be ‘blackmailed’ with the looming threat of ‘massive sporting sanctions’. 

Fans and journalists from multiple nations have reported rainbow-themed items, including t-shirts, bucket hats and flags, being confiscated by officials.

Former Wales captain Laura McAllister was among female football fans who were 'told to take off their rainbow bucket hats' at the Qatari stadium ahead of the Dragons' first match with the US last night

Former Wales captain Laura McAllister was among female football fans who were ‘told to take off their rainbow bucket hats’ at the Qatari stadium ahead of the Dragons’ first match with the US last night

US sports journalist Grant Wahl (pictured) was initially refused entry to a World Cup match in Doha, Qatar and had security guards 'aggressively demand' he remove his rainbow shirt. He was told it was for his own safety

US sports journalist Grant Wahl (pictured) was initially refused entry to a World Cup match in Doha, Qatar and had security guards ‘aggressively demand’ he remove his rainbow shirt. He was told it was for his own safety

She also wrote on Twitter : 'So, despite fine words from @FIFAWorldCup before event, @Cymru rainbow bucket hats confiscated at stadium, mine included'

She also wrote on Twitter : ‘So, despite fine words from @FIFAWorldCup before event, @Cymru rainbow bucket hats confiscated at stadium, mine included’

Foreign Secretary James Cleverly said Qatar has ‘taken real steps’ ensuring ‘gay football fans are safe and do feel secure’.

But several LGBT+ supporters have opted not to travel to the tournament in a country where homosexuality is still illegal.

Conservative MP Alicia Kearns, chair of the Commons Foreign Affairs Committee, warned ‘nothing about their [Qatar’s] behaviour has changed’ since they were controversially handed the rights to host the World Cup more than a decade ago.

When asked about her hopes for the tournament to deliver change in Qatar, Ms Kearns said: ‘We should always be hopeful, but I do not meaningfully believe that holding the World Cup in Qatar is going to change anything on the ground.

‘Because if it was going to, we wouldn’t have seen human rights abuses taking place, there wouldn’t have been the loss of life that we’ve seen taking place.

‘So I really don’t think, unfortunately – and I wish this was not the case – that we can have any hope that things will meaningfully change.’ 

Downing Street said it is closely monitoring the treatment of UK fans at the World Cup – after reports emerged of Welsh female supporters wearing rainbow bucket hats having them confiscated by stadium security.

Former national team captain Laura McAllister, now a professor at Cardiff University, told ITV News that security guards said her hat was ‘a banned symbol’, however she managed to sneak it through in her handbag. 

She said: ‘I pointed out that FIFA had made lots of comments about supporting LGBT rights in this tournament, and said to them that coming from a nation where we’re very passionate about equality for all people, I wasn’t going to take my hat off.’

‘They were insistent that unless I took the hat off we weren’t actually allowed to come into the stadium.’

McAllister added: ‘I think we’ve had plenty of warning that this wasn’t going to be a tournament where human rights, LGBT rights and women’s rights were going to be well respected, but coming from a nation like Wales, we were very keen that we still took a stand coming here.’

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