Katie Couric helps provide free baby formula to 111 moms dealing with breast cancer

Katie Couric helps provide a year’s worth of free baby formula to 111 moms dealing with breast cancer: ‘These women have been through an awful lot’

Now that she’s cancer-free, Katie Couric is reaching out to help other women who are breast cancer survivors. 

The 65-year-old journalist and healthcare activist has teamed with organic baby formula company Bobbie and the non-profit organization Breasties to provide 111 mothers with a year’s worth of food for their infants. 

The gift announcement was made on a large Zoom call with dozens of mothers and pregnant women who have had mastectomies and are unable to nurse their children.

Reaching out: Now that she is cancer free, Katie Couric, 65, is reaching out to help other women dealing with breast cancer (Pictured in New York in September)

Reaching out: Now that she is cancer free, Katie Couric, 65, is reaching out to help other women dealing with breast cancer (Pictured in New York in September)

Katie was diagnosed in June and went public with her diagnosis via an essay entitled Why NOT Me? in September, following a lumpectomy and radiation treatment. She also shared video of her experience her podcast Next Question with Katie Couric.

Some 3.8 million women in the US are dealing with breast cancer. 

The disease kills 42 thousand women and five hundred men each year. 

Free formula: The former Today anchor was on hand to tell 111 new moms and pregnant women who have dealt with breast cancer they would receive a year's supply of organic Bobbie brand formula for free

Free formula: The former Today anchor was on hand to tell 111 new moms and pregnant women who have dealt with breast cancer they would receive a year’s supply of organic Bobbie brand formula for free

Personal experience: Katie was diagnosed in June and went public with her diagnosis in September. She shared her experience undergoing a lumpectomy and radiation treatment on  her podcast Next Question with Katie Couric

Personal experience: Katie was diagnosed in June and went public with her diagnosis in September. She shared her experience undergoing a lumpectomy and radiation treatment on  her podcast Next Question with Katie Couric

In an interview with People, the former Today anchor explained she wanted to use her experience to help others.  

‘One of the reasons I wanted to be public about my diagnosis’ she explained, ‘is I know that I have the capability to influence public health in this country and to educate and inform people and arm them with the knowledge they need to live longer lives.’ 

The reporter said she considers it an ‘enormous responsibility’ to do what she can for ‘so many of these women who have been through an awful lot, and not only need emotional support, but need financial support as well, some of them.’ 

Responsibility: Katie said she considers it an 'enormous responsibility' to do what she can for 'so many of these women who have been through an awful lot, and not only need emotional support, but need financial support as well' (Pictured in Los Angeles in March)

Responsibility: Katie said she considers it an ‘enormous responsibility’ to do what she can for ‘so many of these women who have been through an awful lot, and not only need emotional support, but need financial support as well’ (Pictured in Los Angeles in March) 

Devastating loss: Katie lost her first husband, Jay Monahan, to colon cancer in 1998. She began advocating for colonoscopies in 2000 by share her own procedure live on television. As a result more people began getting tested

Devastating loss: Katie lost her first husband, Jay Monahan, to colon cancer in 1998. She began advocating for colonoscopies in 2000 by share her own procedure live on television. As a result more people began getting tested

Katie began advocating for colonoscopies after her first husband, Jay Monahan, died from colon cancer in 1998 and kicked off a yearly campaign in 2000, when she shared her own colonoscopy live with TV viewers. 

That event and her yearly campaign in which she persuaded friends to televise their own colonoscopies has led to an increase in the number of people undergoing the procedure. 

Now the Katie Couric Media founder is working to make formula and donor breast milk available to cancer survivor by asking lawmakers to require insurance companies to cover the costs for all parents who have undergone a mastectomy.

Advocacy: The journalist is working to make formula and donor breast milk available to cancer survivor by asking lawmakers to require insurance companies to cover the costs  for all parents who have undergone a mastectomy (Pictured in New York in September)

Advocacy: The journalist is working to make formula and donor breast milk available to cancer survivor by asking lawmakers to require insurance companies to cover the costs  for all parents who have undergone a mastectomy (Pictured in New York in September)

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