MSNBC’s Joy Reid concedes ‘framing’ of Muslim comments ‘didn’t work’ | TheHill – The Hill

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MSNBC’s Joy Reid conceded Wednesday that “the way that [she] framed” a comparison of President TrumpDonald John TrumpMelania Trump used private email account while in White House, ex-friend says Trump reiterates call for drug test before debates, claims Biden ‘is on some kind of an enhancement’ How Markey took down a Kennedy MORE’s supporters to radicalized Muslims “didn’t work.”

Reid drew widespread criticism after saying Monday that the president and his allies were “radicalizing supporters” in a way comparable to “the way Muslims act.”

Critics included the Council on American-Islamic Relations and Rep. Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarIlhan Omar calls on MSNBC’s Joy Reid to apologize over comments labeled Islamophobic Trump attacks Biden hard in White House address accepting GOP nomination LeBron James voices support for Bucks NBA boycott: ‘We demand change’ MORE (D-Minn.), who said “[w]e deserve better and an apology for the painful moment for so many Muslims around our country should be forthcoming.”

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During her show Wednesday evening, Reid did not explicitly apologize and accused some critics of bad faith. “I asked that question on Monday, and there was a lot of conversation, particularly online after the segment aired, some of which was frankly not in good faith,” Reid said.

“But some of the conversation reflected the genuine feelings of people who have been subjected to the kind of stereotyping that I just described, and who take matters like this to heart because of it,” she added. “And we should all be sensitive to that, and I certainly should have been sensitive to that.”

Reid went on to discuss the Monday comments with Newsweek editor-at-large Naveed Jamali, a guest during the segment in question. During her discussion with Jamali she conceded her phrasing was “not exactly the most artful way of asking that question, obviously, based on the reaction” and that “the way that I framed it obviously didn’t work.”

Another guest, Dalia Mogahed, the director of research for The Institute for Social Policy and Understanding, said that while Reid had historically “given Muslim voices a fair shake,” her phrasing had suggested “Muslims were inherently violent.”

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