Urgent warning issued after highly venomous red-bellied black snake is found in a backyard pool

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A snake catcher has warned families to check before going swimming after a red-bellied black snake was caught in a backyard pool.   

Stuart McKenzie from Sunshine Coast Snake Catchers was called to a home in Twin Waters, Maroochydore, after reports of a swimming snake. 

‘It must have been going along the side, just exploring, looking for frogs probably and fell in and couldn’t get back out,’ Mr McKenzie told Daily Mail Australia. 

An urgent warning has been issued after a venomous red-bellied black snake (pictured above) was found in a backyard pool on the Sunshine Coast on Monday

An urgent warning has been issued after a venomous red-bellied black snake (pictured above) was found in a backyard pool on the Sunshine Coast on Monday 

Snake catcher Stuart McKenzie was called to the Maroochydore home (pictured) and fished the 1.2metre-long snake out of the water with his bare hands

Snake catcher Stuart McKenzie was called to the Maroochydore home (pictured) and fished the 1.2metre-long snake out of the water with his bare hands 

Footage captured Mr McKenzie grabbing the snake by his tail and lifting him out of the water at a corner of the pool.   

‘That’s a very chunky snake… that’s a very healthy red-belly probably about four foot (1.2m).   

‘They’re highly venomous… if you get bitten by this guy it’ll be a trip to the hospital that’s for sure,’ Mr McKenzie could be heard saying.     

The snake catcher loaded the red-belly into a blue snake catching bag and later released him back into the wild.   

‘It took a little bit of time, I knew it was just going to keep swimming around and I would have to time it well.

‘I just took my time, didn’t rush it and eventually grabbed him out of the pool. I tried to follow him around the pool probably three or four times,’ Mr McKenzie explained. 

Mr McKenzie (pictured) said snakes were 'quite common' around backyard pools and urged Australians to take extra precautions over the summer and be wary of snakes

Mr McKenzie (pictured) said snakes were ‘quite common’ around backyard pools and urged Australians to take extra precautions over the summer and be wary of snakes 

HOW TO AVOID SNAKES THIS SEASON

Remove pet water bowls from near entry or exit points as they can attract thirsty snakes 

Keep doors closed in warmer weather and make sure there are no holes in the screens 

Try to reduce number of rats or mice in the home by clearing away uneaten pet food

Trim overhanging plants and remove overgrown shrubs or weeds 

Do not leave shoes at the doorstep  

Keep shelves at least 30 centimetres from the ground – particularly in the shed or carport    

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Mr McKenzie (pictured) said he followed the snake around the pool three or four times before he was able to grab him. The snake was then release back into the wild

Mr McKenzie (pictured) said he followed the snake around the pool three or four times before he was able to grab him. The snake was then release back into the wild 

Mr McKenzie said snakes could often be found near backyard pools during the summer.   

‘It is quite common especially as it warms up.   

‘Especially when there’s a bit of a lip on the pool or the pool is not completely filled. If they fall in they often can’t get back out,’ he explained. 

The snake catcher warned Australians to always be cautious and contact a professional if they encounter a snake.   

‘Regardless whether you’ve got a pool or not it’s that time of year where snakes are on the move and you have to take extra precautions and be vigilant.  

‘If you see a snake don’t do anything silly and just call you local snake catcher.’  

Red-bellied black snakes 

Red-bellied black snakes are a venomous snake species native to the east coast of Australia. 

They are commonly found in woodlands and forests usually in the close vicinity of water sources such as streams, rivers, creeks, seasonally inundated alluvial woodlands, lagoons, swamps and other wetlands.

It is also common in urban areas along Australia’s eastern coast and it has also adapted to live in modern rural environments being found close to irrigation canals and dams. For these reasons, it’s one of Australia’s best-known snake species. 

The red-belly black snake has an average length of 1.5 to 2 m, but some specimens may reach up to 2.5 m. These are some of Australia’s largest venomous snakes. 

SOURCE: Snake Facts  

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Urgent warning issued after highly venomous red-bellied black snake is found in a backyard pool

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Spread the love
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A snake catcher has warned families to check before going swimming after a red-bellied black snake was caught in a backyard pool.   

Stuart McKenzie from Sunshine Coast Snake Catchers was called to a home in Twin Waters, Maroochydore, after reports of a swimming snake. 

‘It must have been going along the side, just exploring, looking for frogs probably and fell in and couldn’t get back out,’ Mr McKenzie told Daily Mail Australia. 

An urgent warning has been issued after a venomous red-bellied black snake (pictured above) was found in a backyard pool on the Sunshine Coast on Monday

An urgent warning has been issued after a venomous red-bellied black snake (pictured above) was found in a backyard pool on the Sunshine Coast on Monday 

Snake catcher Stuart McKenzie was called to the Maroochydore home (pictured) and fished the 1.2metre-long snake out of the water with his bare hands

Snake catcher Stuart McKenzie was called to the Maroochydore home (pictured) and fished the 1.2metre-long snake out of the water with his bare hands 

Footage captured Mr McKenzie grabbing the snake by his tail and lifting him out of the water at a corner of the pool.   

‘That’s a very chunky snake… that’s a very healthy red-belly probably about four foot (1.2m).   

‘They’re highly venomous… if you get bitten by this guy it’ll be a trip to the hospital that’s for sure,’ Mr McKenzie could be heard saying.     

The snake catcher loaded the red-belly into a blue snake catching bag and later released him back into the wild.   

‘It took a little bit of time, I knew it was just going to keep swimming around and I would have to time it well.

‘I just took my time, didn’t rush it and eventually grabbed him out of the pool. I tried to follow him around the pool probably three or four times,’ Mr McKenzie explained. 

Mr McKenzie (pictured) said snakes were 'quite common' around backyard pools and urged Australians to take extra precautions over the summer and be wary of snakes

Mr McKenzie (pictured) said snakes were ‘quite common’ around backyard pools and urged Australians to take extra precautions over the summer and be wary of snakes 

HOW TO AVOID SNAKES THIS SEASON

Remove pet water bowls from near entry or exit points as they can attract thirsty snakes 

Keep doors closed in warmer weather and make sure there are no holes in the screens 

Try to reduce number of rats or mice in the home by clearing away uneaten pet food

Trim overhanging plants and remove overgrown shrubs or weeds 

Do not leave shoes at the doorstep  

Keep shelves at least 30 centimetres from the ground – particularly in the shed or carport    

Advertisement
Mr McKenzie (pictured) said he followed the snake around the pool three or four times before he was able to grab him. The snake was then release back into the wild

Mr McKenzie (pictured) said he followed the snake around the pool three or four times before he was able to grab him. The snake was then release back into the wild 

Mr McKenzie said snakes could often be found near backyard pools during the summer.   

‘It is quite common especially as it warms up.   

‘Especially when there’s a bit of a lip on the pool or the pool is not completely filled. If they fall in they often can’t get back out,’ he explained. 

The snake catcher warned Australians to always be cautious and contact a professional if they encounter a snake.   

‘Regardless whether you’ve got a pool or not it’s that time of year where snakes are on the move and you have to take extra precautions and be vigilant.  

‘If you see a snake don’t do anything silly and just call you local snake catcher.’  

Red-bellied black snakes 

Red-bellied black snakes are a venomous snake species native to the east coast of Australia. 

They are commonly found in woodlands and forests usually in the close vicinity of water sources such as streams, rivers, creeks, seasonally inundated alluvial woodlands, lagoons, swamps and other wetlands.

It is also common in urban areas along Australia’s eastern coast and it has also adapted to live in modern rural environments being found close to irrigation canals and dams. For these reasons, it’s one of Australia’s best-known snake species. 

The red-belly black snake has an average length of 1.5 to 2 m, but some specimens may reach up to 2.5 m. These are some of Australia’s largest venomous snakes. 

SOURCE: Snake Facts  

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Source


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